Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis - Sweet Licorice - Harvey O. Carpenter - Award Winning Photographer - Big Band
Full Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis - Sweet Licorice - Harvey O. Carpenter - Award Winning Photographer - Big Band
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
WMIN Radio
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis
Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis

Rare Jazz Photograph for WMIN Radio in 1930s Minneapolis

Regular price $125.00

Here we have a rare large photograph of a jazz trumpeter at the microphone at the old WMIN radio studios in Minneapolis. Hit it and quit it, fella! This sweet old photograph is actually titled "Sweet Licorice", and was produced by award winning photographer Harvey O. Carpenter in the late 1930s. Carpenter had a photograph displayed at the 1939 World's Fair in New York (see listing in the shop). When looking at this beauty, I can see why. Perfection in the half light.

Here is a little history of the WMIN radio station in Minneapolis, courtesy of Twin Cities Music Highlights webpage:
http://twincitiesmusichighlights.net/radio-stations/wmin/

The station began as WMIN in the summer of 1936, when St. Paul furniture retailer Edward Hoffman began broadcasting at 1370 kHz. In 1937 the station had a 15-minute program on Sundays featuring black singers that was advertised in the Minneapolis Spokesman. On December 9, 1938, Tom Coleman’s Famous Swing Trio, with Florence Ward, appeared at a dance at Pioneer Hall, 588 Rondo, advertised as being broadcast on WMIN’s Down Beat Program.

WMIN was reassigned to the 1400 kHz in 1941. Around that time, a young Leigh Kamman and his friend Sev Widman hosted “Studio Party Wham,” named after a Jimmie Lunceford tune, showcasing big bands, small combos, and jazz. Kamman produced live broadcasts from Mitch’s Roadhouse in Mendota and hung out at the Club Casino in the Hotel St. Paul where the big bands played. After the war, Kamman produced “We Call it Jazz” concerts at the Calhoun Beach Hotel and hosted “The Swing Club” on WLOL. Kamman left for New York in 1950.


The entire piece measures about 20" tall by 16" wide. The silver gelatin print measures about 11" tall by 14" wide on its own. There is some discoloration along the edges of the matting. Also, there's a tear along the right edge of the matting (see pic). There is slight wear throughout. Please see all pics as they are part of the description.

I ship FedEx to street addresses in the continental USA only (no PO boxes). Free shipping on this rare piece of Minnesota jazz history.

Sweet, sweet licorice. Nothing beats it.