Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master
Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving - 1788 - The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney - After John Mortimer - Rare Engraving - 18th Century - Old Master

Francesco Bartolozzi Engraving of The Death of Sr. Philip Sydney

Regular price $175.00

Here we have a very rare engraving by Francesco Bartolozzi (Italian, Florence 1728–1815 Lisbon) after John Hamilton Mortimer (British, Eastbourne 1740–1779 London). The piece is titled "The Death of Sir Philip Sidney" and was printed in 1788 by Jane Mortimer (British, 1738–1824). The art print represents the Battle of the Zutphen. I can only find examples in a few museums around the world.

There is a lot of detail and depth to this rare European artwork. The look of the horse is a perfect center to this powerful image.

Here is more information on Bartolozzi (source Encyclopedia Britannica):
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Francesco Bartolozzi, (born Sept. 21, 1727, Florence, Italy—died March 7, 1815, Lisbon, Port.) Florentine engraver in the service of George III of England.

Bartolozzi, the son of a goldsmith, studied painting in Florence, trained as an engraver in Venice, and began his career in Rome. In 1764 he was invited to London, where he remained for 40 years. For his patron, George III, he executed numerous engravings, including those after Hans Holbein’s drawings at Windsor. He also made many engravings of paintings by Italian masters and by his friends, the fashionable painters Giovanni Cipriani and Angelica Kauffmann.

Vestris, Auguste [Credit: Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London]Bartolozzi was not the inventor of the so-called crayon manner of engraving, which imitated the subtleties of chalk drawings, but he made it the fashion. In 1802 he was invited to Lisbon as director of the National Academy. His son, Gaetano Stephano (1757–1821), also an engraver, was the father of Madame Vestris.
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Here is a short summery of John Mortimer courtesy of Wikipedia:

John Hamilton Mortimer ARA (1740–1779) was a British figure and landscape painter and printmaker, known for romantic paintings set in Italy, works depicting conversations, and works drawn in the 1770s portraying war scenes, similar to those of Salvator Rosa.

Mortimer became President of the Society of Artists in 1774, five years before his death, at age 39.
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The piece measures 15" tall and 16.5" wide. The piece is over 200 years old and shows its age. There are several tears to note. Please see pics.

1. The bottom right corner is detached. The detached piece will be sent along for possible reattachment.

2. The bottom horizontal edge has a long slice, although it's still attached.

3. The top right center has a hook tear along the edge.

There is overall discoloration. Please see all pics as they are part of the description.

I ship to the continental USA only. Free shipping on this rare piece.

I'm hoping you can make the appropriate repairs and enjoy this amazing print from the 1700s. Two old masters were involved with the creation of this piece, and it shows. Don't miss out.